Curated Randomness Atom Feed

Weekly collection of interesting links that I stumble upon on a wide variety of subjects that I have interest on.

2019, April, Week 4

World

  • How Do Japanese Dump Trash? Let Us Count the Myriad Ways - You’ll be surprised by how much effort that Japan citizens dedicate to proper trash sorting. This New York Times article gives us a glimpse on that.
  • Death by PowerPoint: the slide that killed seven people - This text shows the importance of proper communication — no matter the media you’re using to communicate.

2019, April, Week 3

Programming

  • How to Write a Git Commit Message - This text exposes seven simple rules to create great Git commit messages.

Self-Improvement

  • Less Tweeting, More Doing - This text talks about how fruitless words can be if no action follows.

2019, April, Week 2

Science

  • These Hawaiian Stick Spiders Have a Profound Case of Evolutionary Déjà Vu - as this article reports, geographically separated groups of spiders evolved to the same three ecological types.
  • Why Are So Many Monsters Hybrids? - The Nautilus article explores the captivating horror of category violation.

World

  • The Case for Rooms - interesting CityLab article discussing on why closed floor plans may make more sense in the present world than open floor plans.

2019, April, Week 1

Culture

  • Why You Should Stop Reading News: We spend hours consuming news because we want to be well informed. But is that time well spent? This very interesting text Farnam Street text discusses about it.

History

  • 10 Letters We Dropped from the Alphabet: the video below shows 10 letters that used to be used, but didn’t quite stand the test of time.

Science

  • Meet your long-lost distant cousin, Homo luzonensis - Ars Technica’s text about the newly discovered species that may be related to the “hobbit,” Homo floresiensis.
  • What I learned by living without artificial light - Linda Geddes decided to live for weeks in only candlelight – no bulbs, no screens. This BBC article shows her findings about this.

Self-Improvement

  • How To Be More Productive by Working Less - As Mark Manson’s text explains why working more hours doesn’t implies on creating more.

2019, March, Week 4

Life

  • Don’t Pursue Programming if You Aren’t Passionate About It - Like this article discusses about, don’t pursue programming if you don’t really like it.

Science

  • Successful male contraceptive gel trial brings new form of birth control closer - This text reports about the advances on the creation of a male contraceptive.
  • How Meal Timings affect your waistline - This report discusses how meal timing can be as important as the meal content itself.

2019, March, Week 3

History

  • How Special Paint On The Hood Of The World War II Jeep Protected Soldiers’ Lives - Interesting article talking about a very special paint that was used during World War II.

Science

  • The Purpose of Sleep? To Forget, Scientists Say - Over the years, scientists have come up with a lot of ideas about why we sleep. This New York Times article discusses about the subject.

2019, March, Week 2

Life


Programming

  • Four Column ASCII - This article shows why it’s interesting to visualize the ASCII table in divisions of 32.
  • A Visual and Interactive Guide to the Basics of Neural Networks - The first part of a simple to grasp guide to Neural Networks.
  • A Visual And Interactive Look at Basic Neural Network Math - The second part of a simple to grasp guide to Neural Networks.

World

  • List of eponymous laws - Wikipedia list of laws and principles named after a person.

2019, March, Week 1

Design/UI

  • Dark Patterns.org - Dark Patterns are tricks used in websites and apps that make you buy or sign up for things that you didn’t mean to. The purpose of this site is to spread awareness and to shame companies that use them.

Life

  • The Good-Enough Life - The desire for greatness can be an obstacle to our own potential. Great article.

Science

  • How insects like bumblebees do so much with tiny brains - It is tempting to assume that animals need large brains to perform complicated tasks, but the immense skills of some insects and worms suggest small brains are surprisingly powerful. Great text from BBC.
  • Why You Do Your Best Thinking In The Shower: Creativity & the “Incubation Period” - Great text on why we have the best ideas while we are on the shower.
  • Scientists Have Confirmed a Brand New Phase of Matter: Time Crystals - This text brings information on a new phase of matter. Looked kinda abstract for me, but an interesting read anyway.
  • Yes, There Have Been Aliens - Are there any aliens nowadays? We’re not really sure. But this text explains that, at least in the past, there are strong evidences that they existed.

Tech

  • The Mother of All Demos, presented by Douglas Engelbart (1968) - As stated on the video’s description, The Mother of All Demos is a name given retrospectively to Douglas Engelbart’s December 9, 1968, demonstration of experimental computer technologies that are now commonplace. The live demonstration featured the introduction of the computer mouse, video conferencing, teleconferencing, hypertext, word processing, hypermedia, object addressing and dynamic file linking, bootstrapping, and a collaborative real-time editor.
  • What Is the Oldest Computer Program Still in Use?: you’ll probably be surprised by the answer. - At least I was surprised by the answer that this article brought.

2019, February, Week 4

Science

  • The triumphant rediscovery of the biggest bee on Earth - Ars Technica’s article on the rediscovery of the Wallace’s Giant Bee
  • It’s Official: A Brand-New Human Organ Has Been Classified - It’s an article from 2017, but still is pretty new, comparing to other organ discoveries.
  • What Do My Testicles Do All Day? - If you ever wondered about this… Well, this post has the answer.

World

  • Sweden’s six-hour working day is ‘too expensive’ and could be scrapped - This article describes the results of a 2-year pilot of a 6-hour working day experiment.

2019, February, Week 3

Programming

  • Wat - a humorous take on programming. Short and funny talk.

Science

  • Ant species cultivates coffee for accommodation - Scientists on the island of Fiji have discovered a type of ant that plants, fertilizes and guards its own coffee crops. More on that discovery is shown on the article.
  • You’re an Adult. Your Brain, Not So Much. - The human brain reaches its adult volume by age 10, but is it really finished? This article talks about this.
  • Do Not Eat, Touch, Or Even Inhale the Air Around the Manchineel Tree - Meet America’s deadliest tree on this article.

Tech

  • Five Things You Notice When You Quit the News - Interesting article pointing out that following the news doesn’t necessarily makes you a better citizen and could be taking some precious time of yours.

World

  • Which Language Uses the Most Sounds? Click 5 Times for the Answer - The New York Times’ article talking about the peculiarities of the Taa language.